Why confidence and conduct come first for Bill Morris

Thirteen years ago, Bill Morris received some of the best advice of his life.

He was chatting with Accenture’s head of leadership development about parenting his then 14-year-old daughter. “She said to me, ‘Bill, you’ve got one job with your daughter: to give her confidence,” he remembers. “Do that and everything else will work out,” she assured him. Then, she added, “That applies to everybody you lead. And by the way, in particular, to women.”

Morris, who started with Accenture in Canada and recently retired after completing his second term, saw the organization grow from just 50 people to a workforce of 5,000 people across the country today.

“It was the most memorable piece of leadership advice I ever received,” Morris said.

Today, not only is he proud of his daughter, who is now a lawyer, but he’s seen his company make incredible strides toward some lofty goals, including a 40 per cent target for women in leadership positions and gender parity across its Canadian business by 2025.

Confidence comes first

While mentoring is well-established at professional service firms, Accenture’s research found that only one-third of women have a mentor compared with two-thirds of men.

“Helping your people be confident in themselves is a key aspect of mentoring,” Morris said. “It is now broadly understood that under-represented groups are under-mentored. We started tackling that issue years ago and I would now call it table stakes.”

But you can’t be confident if you’re not comfortable in the workplace, he adds. Through Accenture in Canada’s Conduct Counts program, the company measures workplace conduct in every business unit within every country. It helps leaders identify where improvements are needed.

“While most companies have ways to deal with misconduct when it happens, few have such a comprehensive system for driving improvement,” said Morris. “It creates the kind of environment where under-represented identities feel that, ‘I can thrive here because there are the standards of conduct that will make me feel like I can be myself,’” he said.

“Confidence and conduct come first. They are foundations upon which we were able to transform Accenture’s business in Canada.”

Five years ago, when Morris returned to start his second term leading Accenture in Canada, he took his investment plan forward for global approval. “Part of it was an extensive hiring plan at senior levels. I got what I asked for with one condition – that half the new hires would be women.  While that was music to my ears, I wasn’t sure we could pull it off.”

Over the next six months, his team consulted with recognized Canadian leaders in diversity and inclusion. They surveyed their clients, employees and alumni. “Our clients told us that they expected us to service them with gender parity teams. This finding was pivotal for us because it meant that we’d have a competitive advantage if we could be the first to do that.”

However, they also learned that, as a place where women can build their careers, Accenture was seen as being “in the middle of the pack.”

“These surveys gave us the business rationale to set our gender parity goal – which we did almost a year before we set the same goal globally.”

They then built an Excel model that modeled alternate pathways to the gender parity goals. It would predict what would happen if they adjusted variables like the gender mix of applicants and hires, along with the gap in retention and promotion between men and women.

Then the debates started. “It initially looked impossible, because we refused to compromise on meritocracy,” he remembers. But perseverance paid off. “Finally, we got to something that everybody on the team said, ‘We’re all in.’ And that was powerful because we invented it together.”

From that, Morris and his Canada Diversity Council – made up of his line of business and Employee Resource Group leads – leapt into action with initiatives like diversity moments, which became a staple in every meeting. “That’s where we discuss and debate topics like policy issues and unconscious bias at the start of each meeting,” he explained.

They also put the spotlight on sponsorship. Sponsors use their personal capital to advocate and intervene on an individual’s behalf. “Good mentors might not be the best sponsors. We especially wanted our women and diverse up-and-comers to have strong sponsors.”

Today, Morris is proud of the results. Of 1,100 employees hired last year, 50 per cent were women, and they’re on track to hit their company-wide 50-50 goal in 2025.

And when it comes to leadership opportunities for women, they’re now leading the pack. “When we started to hear from senior-level recruits in the Canadian marketplace that we had become the go-to place where they wanted to work for inclusion and diversity reasons – because we were not there five years ago – that was tremendously satisfying,” he said.

Morris has written a series of blogs about what worked for him and his team.

We are proud to partner with Accenture in Canada for the Inclusion Vanguard Award, a prestigious part of our annual Top 100 Awards! In 2017, we honoured Bill Morris for his outstanding contribution towards diversity and inclusion at Accenture and Canada-wide. At our 2019 Top 100 Awards on November 21, we will celebrate a new winner of the Inclusion Vanguard Award, recognizing a leader who has made a remarkable impact in driving real, lasting change. The Inclusion Vanguard Award symbolizes what we all strive to achieve: a stronger, more inclusive Canada!

The good work continues

The Inclusion Vanguard Award was a defining moment of that success for Morris and his team.

“It was market recognition that we had succeeded in becoming the best place for women to build a leadership career,” he said.

“Receiving this award, which came out of the blue, helped position us further and reinforced that feedback that we were getting from our recruits.”

And even though Morris has retired from Accenture, he says his experience is so deeply ingrained it’s a part of him now. “I was recently approached to give to a university. I told them I’d give if they set and met a gender mix target for their computer science faculty and student base. The targets would be their choice, not mine.”

 

“Powerfully Empowered” isn’t just our theme; it’s our mission

Every year, we pick a theme for our Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100 Awards.

It’s a challenging process because the theme represents many aspects of what we do. It reflects who we are as an organization, the accomplishments of our winners, the diversity and inclusion environment as it stands today, the challenges professional women face and the amazing work we’re all doing together to break down barriers for each other.

Picking this year’s theme, “Powerfully Empowered,” was no different. It’s about women who show their power not through their standing, but rather through the way they inspire and champion others, share their knowledge, create change and help others achieve their best. In short, it’s about celebrating women who don’t stand up just for themselves – they stand up for all of us.

As owner and CEO of the Women’s Executive Network (WXN) and the Canadian Board Diversity Council (CBDC), I often travel across Canada to speak with leaders across roles and industries. Through those conversations, I hear one thing over and over: “I don’t feel comfortable with the word power. I don’t feel powerful.

In fact, for many of us, we’re just plain uncomfortable identifying with the word “power” – we may even feel ashamed of it. We equate it to the car we drive, the office we hold, our physical strength, the money we have or the influence we exert. Some of us even attach negative connotations, especially when it refers to a woman.

Should we stop using the word? Quite the opposite – we should use it more, though in a different way. We need to toss out our old relationship to the word and start celebrating real power.

What is real power? It’s not how we lift ourselves up; it’s how we lift up everyone else around us. It’s quiet in its confidence. It’s unselfish and giving. It’s authentic, humble and honest. It’s kind and joyful. It’s shared, not hidden. It’s brave in moments of adversity and difficulty. It’s pushing forward when you feel like giving up. It’s the way we help other people feel powerful.

When I think of some of our most powerful leaders – leaders like Gandhi, Nelson Mandela and Michele Obama – I realized they all have these traits.

And so does every one of the 110 winners of this year’s Top 100 Awards. They personify this kind of power, across our country and across arts, business, sports, science, entertainment, entrepreneurship, technology, the skilled trades and the public sector. They’re making an impact in their industry while inspiring and empowering others to follow in their footsteps.

Thank you to KPMG in Canada, an empowering organization, for their support and leadership as the Presenting Partner for the Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100 Awards. As with everything they do, KPMG gives 100 per cent of their support to the recognition and advancement of women. They also give 100 per cent in their partnerships and we are grateful.

This year, “Powerfully Empowered” isn’t just a theme. It’s a call to action for all of us to redefine the word “power” itself, to change the way we think about power in our lives and help others feel powerful in theirs.


To learn more about our 2019 Top 100 Awards, presented by KPMG, visit our Top 100 page.

Presenting Partner:

KPMG Top 100 Presenting Partner

Why Sandra Stuart says diversity isn’t a one-woman show

Imagine you just moved to an office in a different country.

You’re in a business meeting with your new team and following along okay, though not great (you’re still learning the language, after all). Everyone around you is joking with each other – and you can’t shake the feeling that you’re on the outside looking in.

It might not be deliberate, but “it just doesn’t feel very good,” said Sandra Stuart, president and CEO of HSBC Bank Canada and the inaugural winner of the WXN 2016 Vanguard Inclusion Award.

The reason she knows how it feels? She’s been excluded before. Through her storied career that began in 1980 as a Saturday teller with HSBC, she’s held roles as far afield as Brazil and sat in meetings exactly like that.

“Your challenge is to figure out how you can belong, how you can fit into the culture,” she said.

Though she didn’t speak Portuguese at first, Stuart is thankful she found people who helped her find a way to belong. It inspired her to take action, too. “I don’t like how this feels and I know I can do something about it,” she said.

It’s been 18 years since her time in Curitiba, Brazil, but it put matters of diversity and inclusion on her radar. And for the last 9 years as COO and now CEO, she’s made great strides in making sure employees at HSBC Canada feel welcome, no matter who they are or where they come from.

Little by little

While Stuart’s proud that “balanced and inclusive is just how we are now,” it didn’t happen overnight. It’s been a concerted effort that grew little by little over the last decade.

“It’s not any one thing. It’s a combination of many things. It’s a combination of spirit, people, energy level, sponsorship, education, a deliberate corporate framework,” she said.

A standout from that mix is what HSBC calls employee resource groups.

“These are groups of employees who have a specific diversity theme, and it’s an opportunity to come together,” she said. “It’s an opportunity for them to educate the organization in terms of not what makes them different, but what differentiates them and how we can learn about it, how we can be inclusive, how we can understand and appreciate difference.”

Within their organization, the groups are wildly successful, she added, since it’s a roots-up movement fueled by employee enthusiasm. “It was kind of lightning in a bottle and it still is on a lot of levels,” she said.

Then there’s the data. HSBC regularly reviews how specific designated groups are progressing, Stuart said, which leads to in-depth discussions about why problems exist and what they can do to correct their course.

About 10 years ago, for example, those numbers showed that there weren’t enough women in leadership and middle management. Digging deeper, they found that women often felt like it was tough to integrate back into the workforce after mat leave. HSBC changed their policies to allow for more flexibility.  They also set targets and she’s proud to report they’ve had a gender balanced board of directors and Executive Committee since 2013.

“The first thing you want to do is, you want to understand what your workforce looks like,” she explained. “Why don’t I have women in senior roles? What is the turnover and attrition rate? At what level do they attrite and what job family are they in when they attrite? That data allows you to have conversations that lead to policy and behaviour changes.”

They use scorecards to measure the results of diversity and inclusion as part of their performance objectives as well. Though the exact numbers are a trade secret, Stuart can share one thing: the goals are challenging, fair, achievable and thoughtful.

And they’ve seen results, she added – so much so that D&I is a given in their culture. Take the Pride lanyard that hangs around her neck, for example. “It’s the little things you do that continually reinforce your belief in the power of the diverse workforce,” she said.

Keeping up with changes

For Stuart, diversity isn’t just about gender.  She is trying to make her organization a place that people feel comfortable to be truly themselves at work regardless of gender, ethnic background, sexual orientation, disability or generation.  HSBC also supports mental wellness and provide access to a broad range of resources, too. It’s both the right thing to do and good business, she said.

After all, they’re a global organization, serving people from around the world. It makes sense to reflect that within their own teams. “When you’re on a phone call in HSBC, an international phone call, you see the power of diversity,” she said.

Winning the Inclusion Vanguard award meant a lot because it signaled that her organization is moving in the right direction, even if it took her by surprise.

“I was incredibly humbled. I was honored. And I thought, ‘oh my goodness, I haven’t done enough,’” she said. “You sometimes wonder if you’re making a difference, and when the market recognizes you with something like that, the whole team gets to celebrate it.”

 

We are proud to partner with Accenture for the Inclusion Vanguard Award, a prestigious part of our annual Top 100 Awards! In 2016, we honoured Sandra Stuart with the inaugural Inclusion Vanguard award for her work that she has done, not only with HSBC Bank Canada but towards diversity and inclusion in Canada-wide. At our 2019 Top 100 Awards on November 21, we will celebrate a new winner of the Inclusion Vanguard Award, recognizing a leader who has made a remarkable impact in driving real, lasting change. The Inclusion Vanguard Award symbolizes what we all strive to achieve: a stronger, more inclusive Canada!

 

She’s also proud that HSBC brought home the Government of Canada’s Sector Distinction & Outstanding Commitment, Employment Equity Awards for the past three years running.

She’s of two minds when it comes to awards like this. The first: she’s excited. Positive attention helps inspire others to do good things, she said. But she looks forward to the day when diversity is so baked into our organizations that it doesn’t need to be called out.

“Bringing positive attention and positive action is a good thing. But I’m sorry we still need them,” she said.

Still, all credit goes to her team who made the win possible, because they lead by example every day of the year, she added.

“The award represented the really hard work of the team around me. So it was something super positive that I could share with everyone.” No matter where they’re from.


To learn more about the Accenture Inclusion Vanguard Award and our Top 100 Awards, visit our Top 100 page.